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郭国汀律师专栏
·《共和革命之父孙中山》1、身世
·《共和革命之父孙中山》3、孙文共和民主革命
·《共和革命之父孙中山》6、日本政要支持孙文
·《共和革命之父孙中山》8、义和拳乱
·《共和革命之父孙中山》9、革命派与改良派
·《共和革命之父孙中山》10、孙文革命与华侨和留学生
·《共和革命之父孙中山》11、晚清的改革
·《共和革命之父孙中山传奇》12、四处筹资促革命
·《共和革命之父孙中山》13、黄花岗起义
·《共和革命之父孙中山》14、保路运动
·《共和革命之父孙中山》15、武昌起义
·《共和革命之父孙中山》16、袁世凯趁虚劫权
·《共和革命之父孙中山》17、辛亥革命的意义
·《共和革命之父孙中山》18、捍卫革命精神
·《共和革命之父孙中山》19、宋教仁遇刺
·《共和革命之父孙中山》20、二次革命
·《共和革命之父孙中山》21、袁世凯破坏共和体制
·《共和革命之父孙中山》22、中华革命党
·《共和革命之父孙中山》23、袁世凯称帝闹剧
·《共和革命之父孙中山》24、袁世凯众叛亲离
·《共和革命之父孙中山》25、张勋复辟帝制
·《共和革命之父孙中山》26.孙文护宪
·《共和革命之父孙中山》27.著书立说
·《共和革命之父孙中山》28.新文化运动和五四运动
·29.新文化及五四期间的孙文
·《共和革命之父孙中山》30.东山再起
·《共和革命之父孙中山》31、孙文为何联俄容共?
·《共和革命之父孙中山》32.孙越上海宣言
·《共和革命之父孙中山》33.阴差阳错 逼上梁山
·《共和革命之父孙中山》34.以俄为师
·《共和革命之父孙中山》35.反帝遵儒
·《共和革命之父孙中山》36.关税事件
·《共和革命之父孙中山》37.国民党一大
·《共和革命之父孙中山》38.三民主义
·《共和革命之父孙中山》39.屡战屡北
·《共和革命之父孙中山》40.最后岁月
·《共和革命之父孙中山》41.壮志未酬身先死
·国际权威专家对孙文的客观公正评价
·辛亥革命重大历史与现实意义
***(32)《还原蒋介石》郭国汀译著
·郭国汀谈论毛泽东和蒋介石
·我为何研究孙文,蒋介石及中华民国史?
·《民族英雄蒋介石》
·《还原蒋介石》:身世
·《还原蒋介石》:辛亥革命中的蒋介石
·《还原蒋介石》:二次革命
·《还原蒋介石》:中华革命党
·《还原蒋介石》:袁世凯称帝与张勋复辟
·《还原蒋介石》:军阀混战
·《还原蒋介石》:南北军政府对抗
·《还原蒋介石》:辞职将军蒋介石
·《还原蒋介石》:孝子情深
·《还原蒋介石》:情深义重
·《还原蒋介石》:远见卓识 肝胆相照
·《还原蒋介石》:壮志未酬身先死
·《还原蒋介石》:列宁的对华政策
·《还原蒋介石》:中共的由来
·《还原蒋介石》:孙中山的“联俄容共”
·《还原蒋介石》:共产党篡夺国民党的领导权
·《还原蒋介石》:篡党夺权
·《还原蒋介石》:‘联俄联共,扶助农工’的骗局
·《还原蒋介石》:蒋介石领导北伐
·《还原蒋介石》:中山舰事件真相
·《还原蒋介石》:北伐雄师所向无敌
·《还原蒋介石》:中共恶意制造南京事件
·《还原蒋介石》:共产党阴谋操控反蒋运动
·《还原蒋介石》:上海三次起义
·《还原蒋介石》:汪(精卫)陈(独秀)联合宣言
·《还原蒋介石》:四一二清党真相
·《还原蒋介石》:恢复北伐
·《还原蒋介石》:宁汉政府相争
·《民族英雄蒋介石》33、汪精卫武汉政府清共
·《民族英雄蒋介石》34、南昌暴动
·《民族英雄蒋介石》35、蒋介石辞职
·《民族英雄蒋介石》36、蒋介石访日
·《民族英雄蒋介石》37、蒋(介石)宋(美玲)联姻
·《民族英雄蒋介石》38、广州暴动国民党与苏联决裂
·《民族英雄蒋介石》40、济南事件
·《民族英雄蒋介石》39、北伐第二阶段
·《民族英雄蒋介石》41、浩气长存的蔡公时
·《民族英雄蒋介石》42、忍辱负重
·《民族英雄蒋介石》43、北伐最后阶段
·《民族英雄蒋介石》44、日本关东军暗杀张作霖
·《民族英雄蒋介石》45、北伐军胜利汇师北京
·《民族英雄蒋介石》46、满洲易帜归国民政府
·《民族英雄蒋介石》47、关税自治,
·《民族英雄蒋介石》48、李宗仁及冯玉祥反叛
·《民族英雄蒋介石》49、南方战云--叛乱的瘟疫
·《民族英雄蒋介石》50 、中原大战
·《民族英雄蒋介石》51 周恩来的灭门惨案
·《民族英雄蒋介石》52、共匪红军的兴起
·《民族英雄蒋介石》53、剿共匪--攘外必先安内
·《民族英雄蒋介石》54、55、56 “九一八事变”
·《民族英雄蒋介石》57 日本侵华与国联
·《民族英雄蒋介石》58 忍辱负重
·《民族英雄蒋介石》59、上海“一二八”抗战
·《民族英雄蒋介石》60、皮肉伤与心脏病
·《民族英雄蒋介石》61儒雅绅士 基督情怀
·《民族英雄蒋介石》62、国家危机和国内政治
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New York Time A Mild Shanghai Lawyer and His Accidental Crusade

A Mild Shanghai Lawyer and His Accidental Crusade
   By HOWARD W. FRENCH
   Published: September 18, 2004 new york time
   SHANGHAI
   WHEN Guo Guoting pauses to think about the course his life has taken, it is the jagged lines, the result of a series of accidents, that impress him most.

   As a college student, he set his sights on physics, but his score on the graduate study exam betrayed him, so he ended up studying law instead.
   
   After graduation from law school, he was sent by the government to be a judge in Fujian Province. Upon arriving there, he was told that what the courts really needed was lawyers, so Mr. Guo complied and went into practice.
   Mr. Guo eventually settled in Shanghai, where he became established in shipping law. Here, his life was altered once again by events more unexpected than anything that had come before. His troubles began when he heard about a law school classmate who had been jailed for taking on the Shanghai authorities over the sudden eviction of neighborhoods marked for real estate development.
   The classmate, Zheng Enchong, had not been a close friend. Mr. Guo said he barely recalled him, in fact. But hearing the man had been jailed - after a five-hour secret trial - for filing hundreds of lawsuits on behalf of dispossessed Shanghai residents, and recognizing that no other lawyers would represent him for fear of being blacklisted, or worse, Mr. Guo said he felt compelled to step forward.
   "I wasn't being a hero," said Mr. Guo, 46, a short, affable man previously known by his colleagues more for his strong work ethic and modesty than for crusading. "I was doing the right thing."
   The rest, as they say, is history, personal history of the brutal, hard-knock variety commonplace in China, a place that may be changing rapidly in many ways but where one old rule endures: you can't fight City Hall.
   SINCE he was a young man, Mr. Guo said, he has dreamed of a quiet life in a small village somewhere, a life in the shadows of a mountain in a small house close enough to a river or brook to hear the gurgling flow of the water from his study.
   "I don't like arguments," he said, chuckling at himself, during a interview in a restaurant atop a skyscraper affording one of the best views of this city's skyline. "I don't even enjoy social intercourse so much, to tell the truth. My kind of personality really isn't suited for being a lawyer."
   For his efforts to defend a friend and principle, Mr. Guo has recently been driven from the law, deprived of a livelihood after most of his paying clientele was scared away, but not before adding his name to a long and growing roll of accidental activists, people driven to do something in their own immediate spheres by the intolerable injustices they encounter in everyday life.
   One of those is the dispossession of the powerless, which has long been the dirty little secret behind much of China's extraordinary urban development. Local authorities have been able to condemn buildings and clear land without so much as a hearing, and distribute the land to developers in murky, no-bid sweetheart deals.
   In Shanghai, a fantasyland of skyscrapers today in a city where tall buildings scarcely existed only 15 years ago, these stories have a particularly breathtaking quality to them. In some instances, residents of old properties in choice areas of the city have been summoned to the police station only to return and find their houses demolished.
   Mr. Zheng had angered local officials by filing a series of lawsuits and court motions designed to at least slow the land expropriations.
   In a touch that could have been borrowed from Kafka, the city government accused Mr. Zheng of violating security laws for faxing public documents about a real estate case to a human rights group in the United States.
   That was when Mr. Guo took up his case, filing an appeal for his schoolmate in the Shanghai High People's Court. Immediately, he said, there were warnings to stop, subtle at first, but then increasingly menacing. Then his main business, representing maritime shippers, began to fall off, his clients frightened away. "The authorities called me in 18 times to tell me to abandon this case," he said. "It's not a legal matter, it's a political matter, they'd say.
   "Finally, a midlevel cadre warned me, 'If you pursue this case any further, whatever comes of it will be entirely your own responsibility.'
   A Mild Shanghai Lawyer and His Accidental Crusade
   Published: September 18, 2004
    Gao Feng/Imagine China, for The New York Times
   "I believe that, one case at a time, we can change the legal system.
   "Other city officials approached me privately to say they personally didn't want to do this to me," said Mr. Guo, whose hands stay busy with his cellphone and cigarettes as he speaks. "It is the people behind the scenes, the higher ups who have decided this. This is how things work in China, the powerful people remain invisible, but there will always be mid-level cadres who are willing to tell you what is happening."
   Despite the mounting trouble, Mr. Guo said he had given blunt advice to his classmate, Mr. Zheng. "I told him that you have a choice," he said. "If you drop the matter and admit that you were wrong, you can go free. But if you do that, nobody will respect you."
   Mr. Zheng remained resolute, but his appeal was ultimately rejected.
   Mr. Guo's feelings about social justice developed only gradually. Slowly, in the course of his practice, activism bit him, he says, as he began exchanging ideas with other lawyers about how to improve the workings of China's rickety legal system and to protect individual rights. Encouraged by colleagues, Mr. Guo eventually began posting his thoughts on legal issues on the Internet. He emerged as a prominent figure in local law circles, someone looked up to and regarded with awe by younger lawyers.
   "Most Chinese lawyers just want to make money, to become rich," Mr. Guo said in an initial interview some weeks ago, sounding almost like a happy warrior. "I want to make money, too, but as a man, I don't want to forget my purpose, or forget higher ideals. I believe that, one case at a time we can change the legal system."
   SEEN again more recently, after the news that Mr. Zheng's appeal had been denied, the lawyer seemed like a different man, defeated, even depressed. Another case he had taken on, an even more radical challenge to the system, was now headed to a foreordained defeat. It was a defense of a citizen's rights under the Constitution to try to form an independent political party.
   Speaking at a teahouse, dressed casually in short sleeves, Mr. Guo somberly announced he was quitting the law. He had been spending his own money to argue cases like these and had not had any income for the last four months, and could not support his family.
   The political case had meaning for him because he saw some value in putting his arguments on the Internet. "It is the demand of the people and of the times to end one-party rule and to free the press," he wrote in his bold summation. The authorities, however, had already blocked Mr. Guo's writings from the legal Web sites he once used.
   "I always thought things would gradually get better," Mr. Guo said, explaining how things had come to this pass. "I now realize how dark our society is, and our legal system is just the same."
   Fighting with city hall in Shanghai - and losing Published in International HeraldTribune - Indexed on Sep 17, 2004 Relevance: SHANGHAI When Guo Guoting pauses tothink about the course his life has taken, it is the jagged lines, the results ... shanghai.newstrove.com/ - 101k
   Fujian Post
   ... Fighting with city hall in Shanghai - and losing When Guo Guoting pauses to thinkabout the course his life has taken, it is the jagged lines, the results of a seriesof accidents, that impress him most.As a college student, he set his sights ... www.fujianpost.com/ - 101k
   IHT: Asia/Pacific
   ... Australia: News.com.au. A Special Section for Expats. AT HOME ABROAD. Fighting withcity hall in Shanghai - and losing. When Guo Guoting pauses to think about the coursehis life has taken, it is the jagged lines that impress him most.Diplomat ...www.kniff.de/cgi-bin/cgiproxy/nph-proxy.cgi/ 010110A/http/www.iht.com/asia.html -

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